The information and opinions expressed on The Critical Reader are the exclusive work of Erica Meltzer and are in no way affiliated with the College Board or the ACT. The structures are because + of + noun/noun phrase and because + subject/verb: Since is often used in place of because. Since this is the end of the lesson, I will need to say bye and thanks for studying today. Do you know how to use them? Due to the hurricane last week, I was without electric power for a day and a half. Get the latest news and gain access to exclusive updates and offers. So you might want to say: The game was canceled because of rain. Just share this lesson with them. Privacy Policy, Policies for Online Courses, Books, Lessons, Downloadable Material, and Memberships, Self-Study English Lessons  1. happening or existing as a direct result of someone or something else. 2. As is can used in place of since to show a reason, but this use is not as common as since or because. Ravi … Free APUSH 2020 PDF Guide (Larry Krieger), Why You Won’t Go to Harvard on a National Merit Scholarship. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser. Thanks for studying today! The girl stayed at home due to her illness. The correct sentence would be: ---The game was lost because of bad … due to prep. For example, I have been living here since 1990. The structure is due to + noun: Because is more conversational and less formal than due to. I was happy when the power came back later that day. The game was lost due to bad officiating. Since this is the end of the lesson, I will need to say bye and thanks for studying today. I wanted to leave early since I was not enjoying the party. Podcast  In sentence #1, his is a possessive pronoun that modifies the noun defeat. According to this view, it is incorrect to say The concert was canceled due to the rain, but acceptable to say The cancellation of the concert was due to the rain, where due continues to function as an … That leaves (B), which is clean, clear, and correct. I went to the library on Monday since I couldn’t use internet at home, but they were closed due to the hurricane. If it doesn’t, because or another, grammatically appropriate synonym should be used instead. In reality, due to is a synonym for caused by. He was out of work owing to a physical injury. 6. It can be eliminated too. Copyright © 2016 by HarperCollins Publishers. (A) national force, and its morale was high due to the belief In order to post comments, please make sure JavaScript and Cookies are enabled, and reload the page. Michael September 2, 2011 Grammar 8 Comments. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser. Here, due to actually makes sense; however, the chance that it will appear in a correct answer on the GMAT is extremely low. The structure is due to + noun: Due to the hurricane last week, I was without electric power. Therefore, “due to” should not be used. The phrase is generally considered an all-purpose synonym for because. Jobs could be lost due to political changes. Thus, the meaning of as can be confusing: *When the meaning of as can be confused, as in the above example, we use because. Yes, often for 'negative reasons' – but there are 460 000+ Google hits for "due to his kindness", eg "Due to his kindness everybody use to respect him." The phrase is generally considered an all-purpose synonym for because. Critical Thinking: Why is it So Hard to Teach? The verb “was” is a … In real life, it is of course perfectly acceptable to say things like He arrived half an hour late due to the rain, or Consumer spending is down due to the recession. For example, As I was eating, the power went out. 2. All rights reserved. They cannot be followed by a clause. That means you’re likely to see questions that look something like this: At the Battle of Waterloo, the French army formed a homogeneous national force, and its moral was high due to the belief that Napoleon was the greatest soldier since Julius Caesar. You could, of course, read meticulously through each answer, considering how it sounds. Now, consider a sentence closer to what you’ll encounter on the GMAT: Correct: At the Battle of Waterloo, the French army formed a homogeneous national force whose high morale was due to (caused by) the belief that Napoleon was the greatest soldier since Julius Caesar. 4. Correct: Consumer spending is down as a result of the recession. Your email address will not be published. ‘Due to the rain/because of the rain I missed the bus,’ though a moment’s thought shows that ‘due to’ here is wrong, as you explain. When it comes to GMAT grammar, it can be helpful to distinguish between those idioms whose, In real life, it is of course perfectly acceptable to say things like, At the Battle of Waterloo, the French army formed a homogeneous, national force, and its moral was high due to the belief, (A) national force, and its morale was high, (D) national force, with its morale that was high, (E) national force, its high morale being. Do you know how to use them? There are many diverse influences on the way that English is used across the world today. A lot of this will be due to his efforts. YouTube Answers. Create an account and sign in to access this FREE content, He fell through the window, causing the glass to. In fact, this use of due to is so common that most people won’t even think twice when they hear it. Now, let's see one more example: 1. Due to offers an excellent case in point. As you can imagine, not having power can make life in the 21 Century difficult. We stayed inside because it was raining. That’s because without electricity, there is no internet and without internet we can’t do much here at Happy English. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! We look at some of the ways in which the language is changing. If you’re not sure whether due to is being used correctly, plug in caused by, and see if the sentence still makes grammatical sense. -(C) is wordy and contains a gerund, believing, so you can assume it’s wrong as well. (B) national force whose high morale resulted from the belief “Because of,” on the other hand, should modify verbs. Since, as, because, and due to all are used to explain a reason for something. Here, as means while. In fact, this use of due to is so common that most people won’t even think twice when they hear it. Answers that include because (of) or as a result (of) are, in contrast, far more likely to be correct. 1. -(D) is the longest answer, and it’s also very awkward. Due to offers an excellent case in point. How I Rewired My Brain to Become Fluent in Math, Silent StopWatch (for standardized tests), The Usefulness of Brief Instruction in Reading Comprehension Strategies, What David Coleman Doesn’t Know About Literature, Why a Great Individual is Better than a Good Team. A much more effective approach, however, is to work as follows: -(A) and (E) contain due to — assume they’re wrong. For example, try plugging in caused by to one of the examples above: Incorrect: Consumer spending is down caused by the recession. Due to or Because of? Required fields are marked *. The GMAC is primarily interested in whether you can identify when it is being used incorrectly. Play Again! Based on this shortcut, “due to” is being properly used if “caused by” can be properly substituted. Thanks to recent research, effective treatment is available. His defeat was due to the lottery issue. (E) national force, its high morale being due to their belief. 'Due to', in spite of the meaning of 'due', is often used interchangeably with 'because of'. (D) national force, with its morale that was high because of the belief Terms & Conditions Thus, the meaning of since can be confusing: *When the meaning of since can be confused, as in the above example, we use because. She didn’t love cats so she wasn’t happy when her husband brought two kittens home. However, we use these words differently. Unfortunately, that … Currently you have JavaScript disabled. Unfortunately, that usage is not technically correct — and that is exactly why the GMAT targets it. Since, as, because, and due to all are used to explain a reason for something.